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Posts Tagged ‘dogs’

Pig does agility

Hi folks,

I want a pig! They seem to be a real competition for us K9s, and they are smart, cute and clean!

now here’s the latest: the BBC reports about a pig able to perform agility tricks. Pig Sue (a boy, mind you!) is a bit slow, but he knows what to do, if he gets a treat.

Have a look yourself…

A farm owner in Herefordshire has attracted comparisons with the film Babe after teaching her pig to perform agility tasks like a dog.

Unlike the character in Babe, Sue the boar can not round-up sheep, but he can respond to commands like a well trained border collie, his owner said.

Wendy Scudamore, of Barton Hill Animal Centre in Hereford said Sue began copying her dog in agility training.

She said he would “never be a sheep-pig” but hoped he entertained people.

Mocking name

Mrs Scudamore said Sue was reared to be a breeding pig but was named after the Johnny Cash song “A Boy Named Sue” owing to an unfortunate incident at the vets aged two months when he was accidentally castrated.

She said: “I don’t usually name my pigs until they grow a bit older and develop a character but I thought it would be funny to call him Sue after that.”

Mrs Scudamore breeds New Zealand Kuni Kuni pigs and said she hoped Sue would be an amusing attraction to draw people to her stand at country shows.

She trains him for up to 15 minutes at a time in the back garden and rewards him with little pieces of apple and occasionally, his favourite treats, custard creams.”

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The two muses

Alpha Su is a painter, but she’s not very good in painting BLACK labradors. Maybe she’ll learn one day. But for the time being, we pretend being yellow, or blue or green, depending on her mood.

We love her nonetheless, because she always treats us with lots of chewing bones if we’re a pain and she wants to keep us quiet. She thinks that for us it’s a privilege to be in her studio with her, whereas we know that she really enjoys and needs our peaceful and selfless company. (Until someone rings the doorbell or it’s time for our supper that is…)

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summer fun

We had friends over for two weeks; that was a great time for Mali and me, because the kids loved to play with us. Now they are gone, and I am a bit bored. But then, I love my peace and quiet, too.


with my little friend


you can tell we had a great time


… although they were not very happy when I showed them their ball!

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Apparently, we were domesticated from our wolf ancestors about 15,000 years ago. This date would make us, the K9s,  the first species to be domesticated by humans.

Evidence suggests that we were first domesticated in East Asia, possibly China, and some of the peoples who entered North America took us with them from Asia.


The wolf. Illustration: The wolf approaches a sheepfold like a dog, stealthily and silently, without waking the shepherd. His eyes shine at night like lamps.

As humans migrated around the planet a variety of K9 forms migrated with them. The agricultural revolution and subsequent urban revolution led to an increase in the dog population and a demand for specialization. These circumstances would provide the opportunity for selective breeding to create specialized working dogs and pets.

This all shows that the relationship between human and canine has deep roots.

So who exactly are we? How did we become these more than recognised 800 breeds and uncountable mongrels?
Dogs are not simply domesticated wolves. They are truly their own species, shaped by the same process that created coyotes and other canids that have split from each other on the family tree. Perhaps by viewing dogs as deformed or substandard wolves created by people, we fundamentally misunderstand and underestimate them as the unique species that they are.”

How true!

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